Archive | July, 2011

Top 10 engineering colleges in Orissa 2011

30 Jul

Top 10 Engineering Colleges in Orissa, 2011

1) University College of Engineering  – RANK 1
Burla, Orissa. Ph:                         +91- 663-2430211

UCE under Biju Patnaik University of technology is the top rated college in Orissa providing undergraduate, postgraduate and doctoral programmes in engineering. Teaching mode and handling practicals are of high standards in the college.
Useful links: http://www.uceburla.ac.in

2) Institute of Technical Education & Research – RANK 2
SOA University, Bhubaneswar. Ph:                         +91-674- 2350181
ITER is the part if Siksha O’ Anusandhan University approved by UGC. The institute is dedicated to provide high quality education and is also known for their management system.
Useful links: http://iter.ac.in

3) College of Engineering & Technology (CET) – RANK 3
Bhubaneswar, Orissa. Ph:                         +91-674-2384110

CET possesses well equipped laboratory facilities and campus for students to deliver maximum outcome. Training sessions within the course curriculum is the most notable advantage for the aspirants.
Useful links: http://www.cetindia.org

4) Silicon Institute of Technology – RANK 4
Bhubaneswar, Orissa. Ph:                         + 91-674-2725448

This private institute is counted as top among private institutes in Orissa and one among the top list. They are destined to flourish this as centre for excellence in the field of engineering and technology.
Useful links: http://www.silicon.ac.in

5) CV Raman College of Engineering – RANK 5
Bhubaneswar, Orissa. Ph:                         +91-674-2460693

The college offers undergraduate programmes in various branches of engineering and technology. The placement cell is highly effective in creating opportunities for students.
Useful links: http://cvraman.org

6) National Institute of Science and Technology (NIST) – RANK 6
Berhampur, Orissa. Ph:                         +91-680-2492421

This private institute provides best conditions for the growth of engineers and technologists. The industrial training and consultancy services help students to improve their future standards.
Useful links: http://www.nist.edu/

7) Kalinga Institute of Industrial Technology – RANK 7
Bhubaneswar, Orissa. Ph:                         + 91-674-2725113

Top quality infrastructure and lab facilities in KIIT made it one among the top colleges offering engineering and technology courses. Eminent professors and lecturers deliver informative sessions and ideas for healthy discussions among students.
Useful links: http://www.kiit.ac.in

8 ) Aryan Institute of Engineering and Technology – RANK 8
BARAKUDA, PANCHAGAON, KHURDA, Orissa.      Phone:                        +91- 09776209535

The institute is affiliated to Biju Patnaik university of technology and B.Tech and lateral entry B.Tech courses. They are also conducting supplimentary coaching classes for better carrier options of students.
Useful links: http://www.aryan.ac.in

9) Indira Gandhi Institute of Technology (IGIT) – RANK 9
Sarang, Orissa. Ph:                         + 91-6760-240371

Eminent instructors and high tech lab facilities in IGIT made it as one of the prime choice among aspirants in engineering and technology field. They offers bachelor and degree courses in the subject.
Useful links: http://www.igitsarang.ac.in

10) Orissa Engineering College (OEC) – RANK 10

Bhubaneswar, Orissa. Ph:                         +91-674-2541340

The college, affiliated to B.P. University, stands for quality education to nurture talents for the society. They hope to create professionals with responsibility and dedication.
Useful links: http://www.oec.ac.in

IITs’ PhD jinx: BTechs command higher pay

30 Jul

Foreign universities that would come scouting for young teachers to the Indian Institutes of Technology were conspicuously missing this recruitment season. But a range of private and deemed Indian universities from across the country did land up offering hardly attractive pay scales defined under the Sixth Pay Commission.

When they were pitted against the big guns-the consulting and finance offers-the IITs realized that the PhD jinx continues to haunt them. Every tech school recorded a higher average salary figure for their BTechs as compared to their PhD fellows, most of who joined research labs or signed up for teaching positions.

“It’s a trend that continues. The average salary on campus is Rs 7 lakh, but the average salary for PhD candidates is less than that of the BTechs,” said an IIT Bombay official. The scenario is same on every campus. The slump in the average salary for PhDs also aggravated as universities from West Asia that came shopping for faculty did not turn up this year.

In the last two years, Alfaisal University, Saudi Arabia (which offered an annual compensation to the tune of Rs 19 lakh apart from housing and other facilities), Texas A&M University, Indian School of Business, Hyderabad, were among the education providers that visited IITs and paid salaries comparable to industry. This year, most IITs saw a desi crowd as institutes like ICFAI, SRM University, Tamil Nadu; Saroj Education Group, Lovely Professional University, Rajiv Gandhi University of Knowledge, Vigyan University, K L University and Manipal University took a handful of students.

Every IIT saw a fall in students signing up for teaching posts. At IIT-Kanpur, 45 students joined educational institutes last year; this time around the number stood at 32, said Ramkumar Janakarajan, placement head. Annual compensation remained almost the same as last year. Most of the universities offered between Rs 3 lakh and Rs 6 lakh a year.

IIT-Kharagpur’s placement head S K Srivastava said 67 master’s students and 15 PhD candidates took up teaching jobs this year. “The number was higher last year when more educational institutes had visited the campus.” But several research firms, Srivastava added, had offered better salaries to PhD students this year.

IIT-Delhi’s placement head Kushal Sen said it probably wasn’t correct to compare the salaries of BTechs, MTechs and PhDs as they all took up varied job profiles.

“The salary that an MTech student gets from a core engineering firm cannot match the package that a consulting firm would offer a BTech.”

Sure, but the placements again drove home the point that the BTechs at IITs managed to grab the best deals. In 2005-06, Rangan Banerjee and Vinayak Muley, in their report on engineering education in India had mentioned this irony that exists only on Indian campuses.

“The average MTech and PhD salary is lower than the average BTech salary in India. But the ratio of average starting salary of graduates to masters and doctorates for MIT, USA and University of Illinois Urbana Champaign, USA shows that the average masters’ salary is 22-26% higher than the bachelors’; the doctorates’ salary is 45-58% higher than the bachelors’.”

Pakistan wants result-oriented talks with India : Shahid Malik

30 Jul

Pakistan’s High Commissioner to India Shahid Malik said on Friday that result-oriented Foriegn Minister level talks between Pakistan and India should continue.Speaking in a PTV programme, Shahid Malik said that it was agrred upon by the two countries in the talks that terrorism would be condemned strongly and key issues like terrorism would be addressed and Foreign Ministers would review the progress to set future direction for such “Composite Dialogue”.He said that it was in favour af the two countries to share the information regarding terrorism so that it could be eliminated from the region with joint efforts. He said that Pakistan was cooperating with India in Bombay attack investigations. “India should also expedite probe into the Samjhota Express incident,which had taken place in 2007 but Pakistan has not been up-dated about it so far” he added. Talking about the longstanding Kashmir dispute, he said the people of Kashmir would have to be considered a main party for the solution of the issue and Pakistan had a clear stance in this regard. “Both the countries have shown a clear commitment to negotiate and to resolve all outstanding issues through negotiations,” Malik said.

Muslim clerics oppose RTE, DTC

30 Jul

A slew of recent governance initiatives, including the Right to Education (RTE) Act and the Direct Tax Code (DTC), have irked the Muslims, who perceive it as an encroachment on the community’s fundamental rights.

The newly-appointed Mohtamim of Deoband’s Darul Uloom Mufti Abul Qasim Nomani lambasted theRTE as a violation of the community’s fundamental right to dispense a sound religious education to their children.

“When RTE was in its final stages, HRD ministerKapil Sibal had assured us that minority institutions would be kept out of it. But that hasn’t happened. There are hundreds of small religious institutions that function out of mosques and one-room tenements for whom it would be impossible to meet regulations like teacher-student ratio and conveyance for students as specified in the RTE. Hence, these institutions will go out of business, depriving lakhs of our children of religious education,” Nomani told TOI.

Describing this as a second attempt in recent years by government to launch an attack on madarsas, Imam Bukhari of Jama Masjid said, “It’s good that the government wants every child to be in school, but where does that leave the child with time to go to madarsas, where he is receiving religious education? I agree with the educationists, who are opposing this move because it’s not possible for the child to go to school in the morning, finish his homework during the day, and then go to madarsa in the evening.”

The earlier takeover attempt, he cited, was the government proposal to give aid to madarsas on the basis of the number of students they had on their rolls along with employees’ strength.

A recent meeting of the All India Muslim Personal Law Board (AIMPLB) discussed the implications of both the RTE and the DTC on religious, charitable and educational institutions run by the community. The DTC proposal to bring charitable institutions under its ambit and to levy a 15% income tax on all the accumulated funds of an organization has raised the community’s hackles. The AIMPLB feels that the move would be a deterrent to the functioning of not just Muslim institutions, but all minority-run ones.

AIMPLB member Kamaal Farooqui said: “We have taken a strong exception to this because under this even Wakf would be covered. Charitable institutions may not spend all their income during a financial year, but whenever they do that’s done only for charitable purposes. Charging tax will essentially deprive the needy, who benefit from these services. This isn’t acceptable, and the Board is speaking out in favour of all minority-run institutions.”

President of FDI World Dental Federation visits Manav Rachna University

30 Jul

Dr Roberto Vianna, FDI World Dental Federation’s President visited Manav Rachna International University campus today. Manav Rachna Dental College becomes the first college in India where Dr. Roberto Vianna has visited. Manav Rachna Educational Institution (MREI) is one of the well known and prestigious education providers in India, providing world class education to students from all over the country.

Dr. Roberto Vianna, President FDI was greeted by Dr A.K Kapoor, Principal, Manav Rachna Dental College. Dr Roberto Vianna appreciated Manav Rachna’s efforts in providing International education to students in India and giving them a global platform. He also appreciated the dedication of faculty to assist students in providing them with the best skills and knowledge to meet the global challenges. He said mentioned that Manav Rachna has proved to be a resource of Knowledge providing achievement and competency based curriculum and academic infrastructure.

In his keynote lecture, Dr. Roberto Vianna said, “I would like to emphasize the role of oral health in the well being of a person – the most common disease worldwide is tooth decay. I am overwhelmed to see the initiatives taken by the University for taking dental education to a higher level.”

“The promotion of health, with oral health as an integral component, has been recognized as one of the key factors for a successful and productive society. Health directly correlates with quality of life of both individuals and society, and also with economic and social development of countries as a whole”, he further added.

The FDI World Dental Federation, headquartered in Geneva, Switzerland was established in Paris in 1900 as the Fédération Dentaire Internationale, is the world’s leading organization representing the dental profession. The FDI currently has 156 member associations from 137 nations and territories, representing almost a million dentists worldwide. One of the main objectives of FDI is to facilitate the exchange of information among dentists worldwide.

Speaking at the occasion, Dr. O.P Bhalla, Hon’ble Chancellor MRIU said, “Both the private and public sector dental specialties are challenged to meet the needs of an ever-growing Indian population who cannot regularly access oral health care. Our aim is to produce competent dentists, specialists, and super specialists. Manav Rachna International University’s Dental College took the initiative to generate awareness about dental education and its need in Indian society.”

A new analysis of recent research has revealed gum disease may represent a far more serious threat to the health of millions of Indians than previously realized. These studies found that periodontal (gum) infection may contribute to the development of heart disease, the nation’s number one cause of death, increase the risk of premature, underweight births, and pose a serious threat to people whose health is already compromised due to diabetes and respiratory diseases.

“It seems clear that gum disease, far from being just an oral health problem, actually represents a significant health risk to millions of people,” said Dr Pankaj Dhawan, Dean, Manav Rachna Dental College, expert on oral health related issues.

“Periodontal disease is characterized by inflammation and bacterial infection of the gums surrounding the teeth. The bacteria that are associated with periodontal disease can travel into the bloodstream to other parts of the body, and that puts health at risk,” said Dr. Dhawan. “People think of gum disease in terms of their teeth, but they don’t think about the fact that gum disease is a serious infection that can release bacteria into the bloodstream. The end result could mean additional health risks for people whose health is already affected by other diseases — or lead to serious complications like heart disease.

“Many Indians have oral exams each year to check for cavities and tooth decay. This research shows it is equally important to pay attention to gums. Having a periodontal screening and evaluation could help protect the overall health of millions,” said Dr. Dhawan. The session witnessed the discussions on the developments of the field wherein the faculty from Manav Rachna Dental College and shared advances, perspectives, new ideas, ways and means to avoid failures and breakthrough concepts in Oral Health.

To help people learn more about this health concern, MRDC is launching a national public education campaign, where questions about oral health and gum disease will be answered by Dr Pankaj Dhawan, and educational materials on the link between gum disease and heart disease, diabetes, respiratory disease and premature, low birth weight births.

Top 10 engineering colleges in Orissa 2011

27 Jul

Top 10 Engineering Colleges in Orissa, 2011

1) University College of Engineering  – RANK 1
Burla, Orissa. Ph:                         +91- 663-2430211

UCE under Biju Patnaik University of technology is the top rated college in Orissa providing undergraduate, postgraduate and doctoral programmes in engineering. Teaching mode and handling practicals are of high standards in the college.
Useful links: http://www.uceburla.ac.in

2) Institute of Technical Education & Research – RANK 2
SOA University, Bhubaneswar. Ph:                         +91-674- 2350181
ITER is the part if Siksha O’ Anusandhan University approved by UGC. The institute is dedicated to provide high quality education and is also known for their management system.
Useful links: http://iter.ac.in

3) College of Engineering & Technology (CET) – RANK 3
Bhubaneswar, Orissa. Ph:                         +91-674-2384110

CET possesses well equipped laboratory facilities and campus for students to deliver maximum outcome. Training sessions within the course curriculum is the most notable advantage for the aspirants.
Useful links: http://www.cetindia.org

4) Silicon Institute of Technology – RANK 4
Bhubaneswar, Orissa. Ph:                         + 91-674-2725448

This private institute is counted as top among private institutes in Orissa and one among the top list. They are destined to flourish this as centre for excellence in the field of engineering and technology.
Useful links: http://www.silicon.ac.in

5) CV Raman College of Engineering – RANK 5
Bhubaneswar, Orissa. Ph:                         +91-674-2460693

The college offers undergraduate programmes in various branches of engineering and technology. The placement cell is highly effective in creating opportunities for students.
Useful links: http://cvraman.org

6) National Institute of Science and Technology (NIST) – RANK 6
Berhampur, Orissa. Ph:                         +91-680-2492421

This private institute provides best conditions for the growth of engineers and technologists. The industrial training and consultancy services help students to improve their future standards.
Useful links: http://www.nist.edu/

7) Kalinga Institute of Industrial Technology – RANK 7
Bhubaneswar, Orissa. Ph:                         + 91-674-2725113

Top quality infrastructure and lab facilities in KIIT made it one among the top colleges offering engineering and technology courses. Eminent professors and lecturers deliver informative sessions and ideas for healthy discussions among students.
Useful links: http://www.kiit.ac.in

8 ) Aryan Institute of Engineering and Technology – RANK 8
BARAKUDA, PANCHAGAON, KHURDA, Orissa.      Phone:                        +91- 09776209535

The institute is affiliated to Biju Patnaik university of technology and B.Tech and lateral entry B.Tech courses. They are also conducting supplimentary coaching classes for better carrier options of students.
Useful links: http://www.aryan.ac.in

9) Indira Gandhi Institute of Technology (IGIT) – RANK 9
Sarang, Orissa. Ph:                         + 91-6760-240371

Eminent instructors and high tech lab facilities in IGIT made it as one of the prime choice among aspirants in engineering and technology field. They offers bachelor and degree courses in the subject.
Useful links: http://www.igitsarang.ac.in

10) Orissa Engineering College (OEC) – RANK 10

Bhubaneswar, Orissa. Ph:                         +91-674-2541340

The college, affiliated to B.P. University, stands for quality education to nurture talents for the society. They hope to create professionals with responsibility and dedication.
Useful links: http://www.oec.ac.in

Central and East Zone have the highest number of orphaned / abandoned children in India – SOS Children’s Villages of India Study

27 Jul

Central Zone, which comprises the 3 states of Madhya Pradesh, Uttar Pradesh and Chhattisgarh, houses approximately 6 million orphan children (under 18 years) and this figure will shoot up to 7.6 million by the year 2021 according to a recent study by SOS Children’s Villages of India. It is closely followed by the East Zone which has approximately 5.20 million orphans, and is estimated to increase to 6 million by 2021.

In the east zone, Bihar, followed by Orissa, Jharkhand and West Bengal belong to the poorest districts. Together, East and Central Zones constitute the poverty and child vulnerability belt of India.

As far as the other Zones of the country are concerned, South Zone has approximately 3.47 million orphan children and this figure is expected to rise to 3.66 million by the year 2021. North Zone is the second lowest in the total number of orphan children in the country. It has 2.70 million orphan children which is estimated to reach 3.37 million by the year 2021. West Zone has the lowest number of orphan children in the country i.e. 2 million and is expected to rise to 2.36 million by 2021. (Kindly check the annexures for state wise projections from 2001 -2021)

The poverty belt of India contributes significantly to the large number of orphan children in India. Migration of men from villages to urban slums is a continuous process and most of the migration pattern is forced migration for survival or rebuilding lives, thus depriving children of parental care. Rise in the number of children infected by HIV/AIDS is also significantly contributing to orphaning of children.

India has approximately 422 million children. Nationally, 83 percent of children below 18 years live with both their parents, 11 percent live with their mother but not their father, 2 percent live with their father but not their mother, and the remaining 4 percent live with neither parent. This estimation was done in the study titled India-National Child Vulnerability Situation Analysis Report by SOS to assess the situation of orphan and vulnerable children in the country to make strategic decisions in terms of establishing new programmes and projects in various locations of the country.

“Governmental and non governmental agencies working on child rights must jointly work towards addressing the needs of these children by providing them with nutrition, education and protection,” says Mr Rakesh Jinsi, Secretary General, SOS Children’s Villages of India. “Corporates too need to come forward and actively support child sponsorship programmes of NGOs that reach out to the children in need,” he further adds.

The study found that five percent of children under age 18 experienced death of one or both parents. 3 percent of children have experienced the death of their father, 2 percent have experienced death of their mother, and 0.3% children have experienced the death of both parents. The proportion of children who have experienced death of both parents increases with age and is 10% for children aged 15- 17 years.

The child population below 18 years constitute more than 41% of the total population for the year 2001. The share of child population is on declining trend in line with the national population control strategies and by the year 2021 the child population is estimated to be 37.1%. Approximately 20 million below the age of 18 do not receive adequate parental care and support as they do not have either of their parents. This is estimated to rise to 24.35 million by the year 2021.

Present in India since 1964, there are nearly 32 SOS Children’s Villages reaching out to 6000 abandoned and orphaned children across the country. The village is providing them with a ‘family based care’, nutritional and educational services. Some of these villages were set up in disaster hit areas to support displaced children.

SOS is also implementing the Family Strengthening Program (FSP) that reaches out to children outside the SOS Children’s villages in 32 locations across India. The beneficiaries are typically children of single mothers/ widows, single parents, children living with other family members or below poverty line families. The strategy is to ensure continuation of education & health provisions for children while enabling the family to become self reliant in a 3-5 year period via livelihood/ income generating capacity development. This is preventive program for children who are at a risk of losing parental care/normal family life. FSP reaches 15000 children & the goal is to expand to 100,000 over the next 3 years.

Notes to Editor

About SOS Children’s Villages of India:

SOS is the brainchild of Dr. Hermann Gmeiner, an Austrian, who pioneered the concept of bringing up orphans not just in a regular orphanage, but providing them the security and quality care of a proper home, the love and care of a “Mother” and a framework of sibling relationships providing them emotional security for a lifetime. Typically, an SOS Village consists of a gated community of 15-20 homes with a “Mother ” in each home nurturing a group of 8-10 children, who live together as brothers and sisters.

With the support of many donors and co workers, the organization has grown to help thousands of children in 132 countries. While funding requirements through the years have been met by foreign funders, the “India Shining” story seems to be working negatively for NGO’s. Most foreign funding agencies and donors are diverting funds to more deserving underprivileged countries like Africa.